Albino Black Polar Bear

Ask me anything   You know a black polar bear considered as an albino.

siralex:

lányoknak (de fiúknak is, akiknek nem volt meg)

(Source: animagraffs.com, via rentsocsem)

— 6 hours ago with 9724 notes
aiiaiiiyo:

A Spitfire of the 307th Fighter Squadron after an emergency landing on the beaches of Paestum, Italy, 1943 [1280 × 1020] Check this blog!

aiiaiiiyo:

A Spitfire of the 307th Fighter Squadron after an emergency landing on the beaches of Paestum, Italy, 1943 [1280 × 1020] Check this blog!

(via vitamors-que)

— 4 days ago with 3 notes
themathkid:

Birectification of the cube into its dual, the octahedron.

themathkid:

Birectification of the cube into its dual, the octahedron.

(Source: wizrrd, via spring-of-mathematics)

— 5 days ago with 4901 notes
fkv-1td:

dglsplsblg:

getnthevanihavecandy:

lol

HAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!this is basically bullying. athletic bullying haha. awesome!

nagyon aljas :D

fkv-1td:

dglsplsblg:

getnthevanihavecandy:

lol

HAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!

this is basically bullying. athletic bullying haha. awesome!

nagyon aljas :D

— 6 days ago with 99577 notes

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

The Wankel engine cycle (or Rotary engine)

— 6 days ago with 109 notes

fouriestseries:

Rotational Stability

Time for an experiment! Find a book and secure it shut using tape or a rubber band. Now experiment with spinning the book while tossing it into the air. You’ll notice that when the book is spun about its longest or shortest axis it rotates stably, but when spun about its intermediate-length axis it quickly wobbles out of control.

Every rigid body has three special, or principal axes about which it can rotate. For a rectangular prism — like the book in our experiment — the principal axes run parallel to the shortest, intermediate-length, and longest edges, each going through the prism’s center of mass. These axes have the highest, intermediate, and lowest moments of inertia, respectively.

When the book is tossed into the air and spun, either about its shortest or longest principal axis, it continues to rotate about that axis forever (or until it hits the floor). For these axes, this indefinite, stable rotation occurs even when the axis of rotation is slightly perturbed.

When spun about its intermediate principal axis, though, the book also continues to rotate about that axis indefinitely, but only if the axis of rotation is exactly in the same direction as the intermediate principal axis. In this case, even the slightest perturbation causes the book to wobble out of control.

The first simulation above shows a rotation about the unstable intermediate axis, where a slight perturbation causes the book to wobble out of control. The second and third simulations show rotations about the two stable axes.

Unfortunately, as far as my understanding goes, there’s no intuitive, non-mathematical explanation as to why rotations about the intermediate principal axis are unstable. If you’re interested, you can find the stability analysis here.

Mathematica code posted here.

Additional sources not linked above: [1[2] [3] [4]

(via trigonometry-is-my-bitch)

— 6 days ago with 335 notes

fangirlhearsafandom:

lucilovessam:

i-lied-about-my-age:

toucher:

i always forget there are people in there

i feel like mascots are the every-day version of deadpool cosplayers

Plot twist: deadpool has clones and they’re the ones wearing the mascot uniforms

The red one just kinda devours the girl haha

(Source: tastefullyoffensive, via gyorffygabor67)

— 6 days ago with 214567 notes